Twinned With

twin towns illustration

There’s a little town on the east coast of England – known as Estonville – which is twinned with a little town on the west coast of England – known as Westonville.

The roads of each town are the same. The houses are the same. The locations of schools, shops, and businesses are the all same. Even the people in the two settlements are the same. Well… almost.

See, the people in the twinned towns first appear to be identical. For example, the old man who lives at 129 Main Street, Estonville, has the same dark, curly hair, muddy brown eyes, and deep-set wrinkles as the old man who lives at 129 Main Street, Westonville. The two blokes were born at the very same second on the very same day many moons ago. They have the same interests – fly fishing and woodworking – and both have three children and seven grandchildren, all of which have their own identical counterparts.

What is different about the people in the two towns, however, is their emotions. Their emotions couldn’t be more opposite.

When a person in Estonville feels happy, their identical twin in Westonville feels sad. When someone in Westonville is laughing hysterically, their identical twin in Estonville is sobbing uncontrollably. Extreme calm in one means extreme anxiety in another. Inexplicable rage on one side of the country is mirrored by overbearing good humour on the other.

And are the two towns aware of the state of things? Absolutely not.

But they will be, soon enough. And their knowing will change everything.


To be continued? Maybe. I have no idea. This was more of a stream of consciousness than a story, but I think there’s potential here…

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Author: Ellie Scott

Ellie Scott is a freelance copywriter and fiction writer from Sheffield, UK. She writes speculative and silly short stories and flash fiction. She has published two short story collections - 'Merry Bloody Christmas' and 'Come What May Day'. In 2018 she was shortlisted for the Bridport Prize Short Story Competition. She can often be found loitering on Twitter (@itsemscott), Instagram (@tinysillystories) and Medium (@elliemaryscott).

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