Good Omens by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett | Book Review

Good Omens book cover

The end of the world is nigh, but it is isn’t coming along as smoothly as Good and Evil would have liked. The Antichrist has gone missing, for a start. But they’d have known that if they’d have managed to grab a copy of the Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, which is the only reliable guide to the future written by a witch in 1655, just before she exploded. As Judgement Day draws near, a vast cast of weird and wonderful characters try to figure out their role in the end of the world – if it ever happens, that is.

Good Omens is endlessly funny and incredibly clever, but I never expected anything less from Pratchett and Gaiman. It follows the stories of far too many characters to count (including an angel and a demon, the Antichrist himself, a fake Antichrist, a hell hound, the four bikers of the apocalypse, a modern day witch and a mental old witch-hunter) and the plot jumps around all over the place. However, the warm and witty storytelling style ensured that I didn’t get fed up even when I was totally confused as to what was going on.

One thing about Good Omens that I really loved is how very silly and shambolic and British it all is. Of all the places in all the world, the apocalypse centres around a quaint village in the English countryside, which gives plenty of scope for bizarre rural happenings and eccentric characters. I particularly enjoyed the Them – a gang of young kids which is inadvertently headed up the 11-year-old Antichrist – as they roamed about the countryside philosophising about the world and getting up to no good.

All in all, Good Omens is a truly charming and very funny fantasy tale that will show you there isn’t that much difference between Good and Evil after all.

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Author: Ellie Scott

Ellie Scott is a freelance copywriter and author from Sheffield, England. She has published two short story collections - 'Merry Bloody Christmas' and 'Come What May Day'. Her short fiction has appeared in 'Adler’s Writing', 'One Minute Wit', 'Invisible Illness' and 'VSS365 Anthology: Volume One'. In 2018 she was shortlisted for the Bridport Prize Short Story Award. You can connect with her on Twitter (@itsemscott), Instagram (@tinysillystories) and Medium (@elliemaryscott).

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