Behind the Cupboard Door | Microfiction

Illustration of girl with long plaits - "Behind the Cupboard Door" microfiction

She had to stand on tiptoes — on top of a stack of books, on top of a dining chair — to reach the forbidden cupboard. What might lay inside, she wondered. Chocolate? Sweeties? Chocolate-covered sweeties?

She pulled open the door and yelped.

There was a little head, eyes open and empty, mouth slack, dried crusts of blood running from nostrils to chin.

A note was propped against its cheek.

There are consequences for peeking in Granny’s forbidden cupboard…

She slammed the cupboard door shut, hopped down from her perch and dashed back to bed, books scattering in her wake.

Grandad cackled from the dark corner of the kitchen. “A doll’s head and a touch of fake blood is all it takes to make a child behave, eh?”

Granny popped a chocolate-covered sweetie into her mouth. “Let’s hope so. It’s awful messy to do the real deal. Trust me.”

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5 thoughts on “Behind the Cupboard Door | Microfiction

  1. Loved it, and it influenced a story I was already thinking about, which I note you liked (thanks). I hope you saw the influence, but in a way, I don’t. What I’m trying to say is, you were an inspiration and I’m not a plague.

    It’s said there are a finite number of plots and infinite plot devices. I think it takes real skill on the part of a writer, to create a basis for a completely different story by another. I consider that to be one of the many humanitarian parts of our art, when all we want to do is be heard among the myriad voices, so we help each other, often without knowing it, when we’re not thanked.

    For me, the greatest reward is having readers. I’ve been compared to writers I aspire to be like, never nicking their ideas but making different things from them; and I’ve been cited as an influence, which is probably the biggest compliment. And that’s the one I’m paying you now.

    I was once compared to Roald Dahl, and this little gem of yours is one he’d be proud of.

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